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ann’s oat bread

3 1/2 C flour  •  2/3 C quick oats, plus some for dusting
2 1/2 T brown sugar  •  2 T butter, cubed  •  1 1/3 C water, warm
1 tsp salt, plus some for dusting  •  2 1/2 tsp yeast

While visiting Ann, a dear friend of our family, she shared with me this mouth watering oat bread recipe. Since our time together I have made many variations of this bread, but to keep the recipe true to it’s roots I have shared with you the original one passed down. This is an all-purpose bread that can be used for sandwiches, french toast, croutons, toast or just as a snack … which is usually the way it get’s eaten at my house. Oh, and don’t forget the salted butter! Yes, all you salt-a-phobes, we are talking in moderation here.  Ah, I can smell the warm yeast scent in the air as the bread cools just enough so I can carefully slice a piece. By the way, if your going to butter your warm, fragrant, pillow-like homemade oat bread make sure the butter is somewhat room temperature so the butter melts and absorbs as you spread it. Anyone ready for oat bread yet?

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (during doughs second rise)

Bread Machine User:  As a blessed owner of a bread machine please follow the suggested outline for adding your ingredients into the machine. Use the dough setting and make sure all the ingredients get mixed in well. After the dough rises the first time take the dough out and punch it down, getting all the air out. Knead dough back into a ball shape and form into a loaf. Place loaf into a floured and greased pan, using a knife make several quarter inch slices on top and sprinkle with remaining oats and salt. Allow dough to rise for 30 minutes or up to 2 hours. Bake in a preheated oven on 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until top is golden brown and sounds hollow when you tap on it. Allow to cool completely on rack. Store in air tight container for up to four days or in freezer for three months.

Hand Kneading:  If this is your first time kneading dough please click here for kneading instructions. In a large bowl combine flour, oats, sugar, salt and mix well. Cut in butter and mix with your hands until flour sticks together, the dough should look slightly lumpy. Meanwhile, in a small bowl dissolve yeast in warm water (about 105 degrees F). Once yeast is dissolved pour into the center of your flour mixture by creating a well. Mix flour into center gradually until dough is formed. Knead dough on floured surface for about 15 minutes or until spring-like and elastic, then form into ball. Place dough in a large greased glass bowl, cover with towel and allow dough to rise in a warm, draft-free place for about 30 minutes or until it doubles in size. After the dough rises the first time take the dough out and punch it down, getting all the air out. Knead dough back into a ball shape and form into a loaf. Place loaf into a floured and greased pan, using a knife make several quarter inch slices on top and sprinkle with remaining oats and salt. Cover with towel and allow dough to rise for 30 minutes or up to 2 hours. Bake in a preheated oven on 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until top is golden brown and sounds hollow when you tap on it. Allow to cool completely on rack. Store in air tight container for up to four days or in freezer for three months.

Makes 2 medium size loaves

notes: As for some of the recipe variations I have substituted whole wheat for white flour, honey for the brown sugar and canola or olive oil for butter. Also, I love to finish off the top of my bread with the hand-harvested, flaky and light French Sea Salt  Fleur de Sel. This is a wonderful salt that is hand-harvested for three months out of the year and it’s packed with intense flavors, obviously a little goes a long way. You can pick some up at your local William Sonoma or I have included a convenient link below.

buy now: Hand-harvested Sea Salt

… you guessed it, another birthday, this time my beloved aunt LP in Phoenix, AZ – happy birthday LP!

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2 thoughts on “ann’s oat bread

  1. I love to bake breads, and have got to try this one, though I may use old fashioned rolled oats as i never keep the quick variety on hand. cooking is experimentation so I will experiment a bit here. as well as use some x coarse whole wheat and honey in mine. Thanks for posting the recipe, I am anxious to try this.

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